Case Study: Grants

Grants Cover

Senior Medical Coordinator Mathias Engelmann supervises the release of a rehabilitated Bald Eagle at the McGuire Nuclear Station's Energy Explorium. Photo by Cindy Salvia.

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This partnership with Duke Energy will allow us to expand our programs that target eagle conservation and to engage fifth grade classrooms in this work and inspire the next generation. --Jim Warren

Sponsor Focus: Duke Energy

Carolina Raptor Center released a rehabilitated Bald Eagle in celebration of a $15,000 grant given by Duke Energy last year. The Duke Energy grant supports eagle nesting and rehabilitation efforts, an eagle migration tracking program and the creation of a new fifth grade Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) curriculum focused on eagle migration.

"Carolina Raptor Center has already made a significant impact on eagle conservation in the Carolinas by releasing over 30 Bald Eagles back into the wild since 2008," said Executive Director Jim Warren. "This partnership with Duke Energy will allow us to expand that reach and to engage fifth grade classrooms in this work and inspire the next generation of eagle conservation."

The Duke Energy partnership includes the following goals:

  1. Releasing five rehabilitated Bald Eagles
  2. Releasing one eaglet hatched at Carolina Raptor Center
  3. Outfitting one Bald Eagle with a tracking backpack and partnering with NC State and NC Museum of Natural Science on Life Track Eagle tracking project
  4. Developing the Migration Tracking curriculum unit with Queens University
  5. Identifying new measures of program success

"Duke Energy is pleased to support the efforts of Carolina Raptor Center's STEM curriculum development and eagle conservation program," said Williams. "An emphasis on formal science education inside and outside the classroom is key to inspiring youth and sparking the next generation of scientists and biologists."