Our Featured Raptors

Over 150 nestlings a year are brought to Carolina Raptor Center each spring. We try to re-nest them all but some cannot be returned to the nest. These nestlings are raised at CRC and released during the summer months. Support the release of a nestling or other rehabilitated raptor this summer.

Here are some of their stories:

Baby Barred Owl 20472

Imagine caring for a baby in a nest made of twigs and dried grass, all balanced on a tree branch hundreds of feet into the air. A precarious nursery if ever there was one. Patient 20472, a baby Barred Owl, learned that lesson the hard way, having, most likely, fallen out of its nest and breaking its wing. Rehabilitating nestlings is delicate work. We need to treat the injuries while not imprinting too much on the young raptor and making it too familiar with humans. Luckily, 20472 is on the mend and can, we hope, return to its natural habitat soon. Click here for an individual sponsorship. If you would like to start a crowdfunding campaign, click here. To follow along with the progress of Patient 20472, please click here to its Raptor Med profile. 

 

 

Great Horned Owl 20388

Even a fierce predator like the Great Horned Owl can become the prey. That’s probably the case of Patient 20388 whose one parent was injured and sibling found dead near its nesting sight. When it first arrived it was a fluff of down feathers and healthy, but it needed food and shelter and got both at Rehabilitation Center. Now it just needs to learn how to be that fierce predator it was meant to be and can return to the wild once it does. Click here for an individual sponsorship. If you would like to start a crowdfunding campaign, click here. To follow along with the progress of Patient 20388, please click here to its Raptor Med profile.

 

Black Vulture 20506

Because they find their food on the ground, sometimes on the road when other animals have been hit and killed, vultures are susceptible to being hit by cars. Patient 20506 was no exception. This Black Vulture was discovered stuck in the grill of a car and brought to Carolina Raptor Center for medical treatment. Its left wing was badly broken and after a couple attempts to perform surgery, its wing was finally repaired. Click here for an individual sponsorship. If you would like to start a crowdfunding campaign, click here. To follow along with the progress of 20506, please click here for its Raptor Med profile.